Salt is Porn For People Who Loved Sailing in Wind Waker

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After years of seeing awesome indie title after awesome indie title pass me by, I finally decided to purchase a somewhat gaming worthy computer after a nearly two decade hiatus. I spent about three hours on the Steam store looking for my first game to purchase; the result was Salt, an “early access” title from Lavaboots Studios.

To me, the best part of The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker was sailing around aimlessly, discovering new places and enjoying the beautiful oceanic scenery. Thanks to the game’s seemingly infinite amount of seafaring and distinctly familiar color palette, Salt allowed me to relive those joys a hundred-fold. Throw in a Minecraft-esque crafting system and you’ve got one of the most addictive and endlessly enjoyable titles in recent memory.

Oh, and it isn’t even finished yet.

The game doesn’t feature any sort of cartography system yet, so break out your pencil and graph paper like it’s Zork circa 1980 and chart the seas your goddamn self. The developer promises an in-game mapping feature at some point, but I can’t help but love having to consult my barely decipherable notes on my wrinkled notebook pages when navigating the open seas.

Salt is a decidedly retro experience in almost every way, and I’ve completely fallen in love with it. If you’ve been exhausted by the never ending stream of violence and cinematic stupidity that big gaming has been bludgeoning us all with for what seems like an eternity, head over to the Steam store or the official Salt website and pick up a copy. The best part is, it will only cost you a quarter of what the last shitty first-person shooter for your PS4 did at retail.

A little Salt in the wound, I know.

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  • Tim Evans

    That was my favorite part of wind waker too, for sure.

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