Browse By

All posts by Tim Evans

ToeJam & Earl Are Coming Back

One of the best multiplayer games of the 1990s was ToeJam & Earl for the Sega Genesis. There was so much to do and so many laughs to be had, and the hip-hop stylings made it the perfect way to have a blast For years I wanted a true sequel with more presents, more levels, and more crazy characters to run into. After 24 years of waiting for this very thing, I’m ecstatic to report that the time of waiting is coming to an end. Greg Johnson, the original creator of ToeJam & Earl has launched a Kickstarter campaign for the brand new ToeJam & Earl: Back In The Groove, a game harkening back to the retro glory of the original.…

Werewolf The Last Warrior, The Greatest Game Of Our Time

This is a spotlight that is far overdue, especially for all fans of The Tim And Andy Show. Today I took a honored look at one of th– no The greatest game of all time: Werewolf The Last Warrior, on the NES. Combining precision controls, fluid animations, fair challenge, and an operatic storyline worthy of a series of Hollywood movies, Werewolf The Last Warrior is one of those games synonymous with the beloved NES. Watch the video below to relive your childhood and rekindle the magic that is Werewolf:…

The Battle of Olympus Video Review

I took a little glance over one of my favorite action-adventure games from the 8-bit era, The Battle Of Olympus for the NES. It’s a bit of a Zelda 2 clone, but unlike Rambo, this one is very well done and charming. Check out the video review below, and don’t forget to stay classic.…

A Quick Look at the Sega CDX

The Sega Genesis CDX is one of my favorite items in my console collection. My affinity toward it is based almost entirely on utility; The CDX loads Sega CD games lightning fast* and is also a portable CD player for on-the-go music! What more could a boy ask for? Here is a video of me looking at the console. Enjoy! *Some lightning is very slow.…

Gotta Graph ‘Em All

Last month we took a quick look at a graphing calculator adaptation of Super Smash Bros being made from the ground up to run on such hardware. Well as it turns out that game’s author, Hayleia, has also been working on a version of Pokemon to run on math equipment. This project looks to be a bit older, but it just blows my mind that such a thing exists. It looks pretty damn sweet too, check out these animations of the game: That’s crazy, but awesomely so. I guess it just goes to show the levels of dedication some fans have to a franchise. This hasn’t been updated in a while, and I can’t find any information as to where it’s going from here but it’s definitely worth taking a look at.…

Freedom Planet Is The Best Sonic Game Since The Genesis

It’s impossible to talk about GalaxyTrail’s Freedom Planet without mentioning Sonic The Hedgehog. For one the indie title was borne from a Sonic fangame but beyond that it just reeks of the Genesis’ most famous platformers extending from the blue blur like Gunstar Heroes and Ristar. It feels like a Genesis platformer with the power of a Neo Geo behind it… …and my god is it ever glorious. You choose between three distinct Sonic-esque furries. One is super fast, one can fly a ways, and one is more suited to close combat. Sound familiar? Well, I’ve always said the line between homage and ripoff is drawn with love, and this is definitely a more than a heart-shaped box of chocolates. The only real distinction between the 16-bit Sonic games and Freedom Planet in terms of gameplay are combat the health system.…

Sega Wanted HOW Much for an RPG?

Being an RPG fan in the 80s and 90s wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be. Sure, we had the chance to experience classics like Final Fantasy and Dragon Quest when they were still brand-new, but most RPGs flew off shelves before we even knew they existed. Sometimes they were only on obscure hardware like the Turbo CD, and sometimes they were monstrously expensive, like Phantasy Star IV for the Genesis. Phantasy Star IV is one of my all-time favorite RPGs, right up there with the likes of Chrono Trigger and Final Fantasy VI. That being said, I wasn’t able to get my hands on a copy of the game until the advent of eBay many years after its initially release.…

Super Smash Bros. On Your Calculator?

Yeah, you read that right. Some quirky genius who goes by the name of “Hayleia” programmed a version of Nintendo’s ultra-popular fighting game Super Smash Bros. for the TI-83/84 series of graphing calculators. The real kicker is that it looks and plays really nice. Well, nicer than you’d expect a calculator game to look. Right now, there’s only a smattering of stages and you can only play as either Fox or Falco, but the game looks extremely promising nonetheless. I still have one of those devices from my learnin’ years, so I followed the instructions found on this thread and sure enough, there’s Smash Bros. right under my Bowling and Breakout games. If you have a TI-83 or TI-84 take a look at these.…
Monster World IV

Monster World IV Is an Import Worth Playing

Released very late in the Genesis’ life span, Wonder Boy VI: Monster World IV is a game that slipped the radars of American and Japanese gamers alike. By this time the PlayStation and Saturn were looming on the horizon, so investing in a new game, regardless of its pedigree, would have been a risky gamble for most players. I want to tell you, though, that this is certainly a game worth tracking down. Combining elements of The Adventure of Link with 16-bit platforming goodness similar to QuackShot: Starring Donald Duck, Monster World IV delivers everything you could want from the genre: collectibles, weapon and armor upgrades, catchy music, colorful graphics, and a perfect difficulty curve. “Wow, sounds fantastic Tim. Why didn’t we see it in North America?”…

It’s a Good Thing Transformers Wasn’t on NES

Transformers was one of those pop culture phenomenons that seemed like a no-brainer candidate for a video game adaption. This is was especially true during the height of its popularity, before Michael Bay made it stupid and ruined it forever. Yet, there never was an NES Transformers game. Or was there? Yes, there was a game produced for the 8-bit machine, but it was left in Japan like so many fantastic games.  In this case, however, it’s a broken abomination that deserves to be forgotten. I took a stab at it and still haven’t managed to drink it out of my system.…

Sunman Is the Superman Game That Never Was

Sunman was a game developed for the NES by Sunsoft, and was originally intended to be a Superman game. Similar to Journey To Silius, however, they lost the rights to the property during development. Sunsoft attempted to remove the trademarked elements and make a game out of it, and nearly did, but ultimately decided not to release it. In fact, this game has the distinction of being one of the few NES titles to never see any kind of pre-release advertising. Its existence was finally discovered years after the NES bit the dust by retro enthusiasts. I tracked down a copy of the game and gave it a try here in this video:…

Journey to Silius Left Its Mark on Me

Journey to Silius is a strange case. Good, but strange. Originally intended to be a game based on the film The Terminator, developer Sunsoft lost the rights before the game was completed. Rather than throw the baby out with the bath water, they decided to salvage what they had and make a standalone title. This resulted in a game without movie-licensed graphics or music and a story gone from one of future technological uprising to one of a world torn asunder by nuclear war. As a kid I really dug this game, especially for its kick ass soundtrack; a staple of Sunsoft’s releases in the eight and 16-bit eras. However, my lack of skill in video games was just as bad as a kid as it is as an adult and Silius isn’t the easiest cartridge in the bin. From the start, you are dealing with an onslaught of enemies and projectiles, some too small to see.…

Beavis and Butthead for the Genesis Is Too Smart for Its Audience

I fondly remember renting Beavis and Butthead for the Super Nintendo when I was a kid. It was nothing more than a dumb side scrolling beat-em-up with humor from the show and a stupid plot about getting GWAR tickets. It made sense as a game, but it was definitely nothing special. The other day I decided to pop in its Sega Genesis counterpart. These multi-platform titles always seemed better on the SNES, but I figured I should experience the music on Sega’s system of the same era. Well, it turns out it has the same plot but the gameplay is a whole different affair. This version of Beavis and Butthead is more like a Monkey Island or King’s Quest game. You’re tasked with gathering items and completing tasks around town to get your tickets back instead of just clobbering people.…
bad game

Bad Games Are Good

I have a massive collection of old games. My computer speakers are sitting atop copies of Barney’s Hide and Seek and Columns. I’m nearly swimming in various CDs and cartridges. I think it’s fair to say that a majority of the games I surround myself with are shit. When I say shit, I don’t mean they don’t play well or have bad graphics (though many of them do). I mean a lot of these games were ill-conceived from the gates, full of ideas so poorly implemented that they’re nearly a parody of themselves. But in spite of their problems, these games are a black hole of fun. There’s something charming and comfortable about beating a level in The Count’s Countdown and seeing his smiling face say “Let’s Go” before I bounce around and collect more numbers in his colorful PBS world.…
Black sigil

Black Sigil: Blade of the Exiled Is the Best 16-Bit RPG You’ve Never Heard Of

Imagine you’ve been transported back to 1995. It’s just before New Years, and you’re 13 years old. It’s late at night, and your parents are sound asleep. The only sound you can hear is the rhythmic tapping of blizzard snow on your window above the sweet sound of Yasunori Mitsuda’s “To Far Away Times.” You’ve just finished Chrono Trigger, and like anyone in the throes of addiction, the back of your mind itches with the desire for more. Fast-forward to 2014. A box of random Nintendo DS games arrives at your door. One is bad, two are mediocre at best, and one is shockingly, heart-breakingly good — and you’ve never heard of it before. This game is Black Sigil: Blade of the Exiled, the only title developed by now-defunct Canadian company Studio Archcraft.…
The Granstream Saga

The Granstream Saga Lived a Short Life, but a Good One

Around the middle of the original PlayStation’s lifetime came a game that was spoken of for a short time for being one of the first truly 3D role-playing games, though it was tragically forgotten soon after. This is The Granstream Saga, a title with the pedigree behind it to warrant a huge fanbase, but whose time came and went in the blink of an eye. The game was developed by Shade, who employed a team of Quintet designers. (If that name doesn’t make bells ring, think Illusion of Gaia.) Granstream tells of the story of a post-apocalyptic world where continents float in the air to avoid being swallowed by the flooded world. The narrative is shown through the eyes of Eon, who, along with with his surrogate father, is tasked with blowing bits off of their continent. …
Arabian Nights

Arabian Nights: You Won’t Get Sand in Your Shoes

Near the end of the 16-bit era, a small Japanese developer named Pandora’s Box delighted role-playing game enthusiasts with Arabian Nights for the Super Famicom. We Westerners were not nearly as delighted since it never made it overseas. It’s not all that surprising, since the Nintendo 64 was just months away from release and many gamers were already spending their cash on the bevy of next-generation games that were flooding store shelves. American publishers in the 90s were hesitant to release RPGs to begin with, and were definitely afraid of niche ones like Arabian Nights if they didn’t have a big name to back them up. For the most part, it’s the standard RPG fare: turn-based battles, casting magic, using skills, equipping weapons — you know the score.…
The Super Mario Bros. Fragrance Collection Made Us Wonder What Bowser Smells Like
The Minds Behind the Games
Retrovolve Reviews Books: The Minds Behind the Games by Patrick Hickey, Jr.
Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy
The 3D Platformer: How 1996 Witnessed the Birth of a Genre
Pokemon Nintendo Power
Nintendo Power Predicted a “Pokémon Trade War” in 1998